Fine Arts

About Us

 

Faculty

Dorothy de Val

BMus, MA (Toronto), ARCM (Royal College of Music, London), PhD (King's College, London)

Associate Professor, Department of Music

ddeval@yorku.ca

Dorothy de Val is a musicologist and pianist whose research interests include Scots Gaelic song, the first English folksong revival, pianos and pianism, and Haydn reception in England. Particular research interests include early 20th-century collectors and arrangers of folksong, particularly Broadwood and Grainger, and collectors of Gaelic song (Tolmie, Broadwood, Murray and Kennedy-Fraser).

Dr. de Val is the author of  In Search of Song: The Life and Times of Lucy Broadwood, published by Ashgate in July 2011.  She is a contributor to the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and many music reference works including The Haydn Companion, and is a regular reviewer for the journal Music and Letters. With Patricia Debly of Brock University she organized a conference on Haydn in 2009, sponsored by York University, SSHRC and The Wirth Institute. She is also a member of the North American British Music Studies Association, whose conference she organized at York in 2008.

Professor de Val's research extends into the field of dance, focusing on English social dance and Morris dance (especially Mary Neal and the Esperance Club). She co-organized a conference at York on English country dance in the summer of 2010, and performs regularly as pianist for English country dances with her group, Playford’s Pleasure, with a focus on the life and times of Jane Austen. Her most recent project involves performing music from Jane Austen’s own collection, featuring composers such as Pleyel, Sterkel, Storace and Kotzwara.

Dr. de Val has taught at the Royal Academy of Music (London), Oxford Brookes University and the University of Oxford, and served as assistant curator of musical instruments at the Royal College of Music (London). She joined York University's Department of Music in 1999 and served as Associate Dean in the Faculty of Fine Arts from 2004 to 2007, and as Graduate Program Director in Dance from 2009 to 2011.